DECEMBER ARTIST 2010

SuperKaleidoscope presents emerging norwegian artist KRISTOFFER MYSKJA.

 

Kristoffer Myskja lives and works in Oslo, Norway. In 2008 he graduated from the National Academy of the Arts in Oslo. Myskja works with kinetic sculpture and installations, and has participated in several exhibitions both in Norway and abroad.

 

SuperKaleidoscope is pleased to present Interference machine by Kristoffer Myskja.

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Kristoffer Myskja.

Atypical of today's modern machinery; augmentations of our own bodies designed for convenience and increased efficiency, Myskja's moving sculptures are autonomous machines that counter the current fad of interactive kinetics.

The creations look to the intricate design and craftsmanship of the 1800s. His brass "machines" maintain the authenticity of precious antique objects, whilst ironically commenting on contemporary socio-cultural realities. They encourage us to consider the role of the machine, its omnipresence in contemporary existence and the commonalities in “automated action” that we (and the machines) share, such as the act of smoking in Smoking machine.

As demonstrated ironically in a Machine that uses a thousand years to shut itself down, ‘time’ is also at the essence of Myskja’s work. Specifically, the marking of time, through the integration of sound, mechanical rhythm and a durational progression or transformation of form as seen in Interference machine and Rule 30.

Myskja’s works are temporal in all the right ways – poetically challenging us to consider process and consequence in a light-hearted yet poignant way.



Text by Jordana Maisie

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Interference machine (2009) is a kinetic sculpture that produces sound by moving lubricated cotton pads along the rim of two crystal glasses. A pumping mechanism fills and empties the glasses with liquid in an alternating manner. The fluctuation of liquid levels translates into slight changes in the tones. When two (sound) waves of nearly the same frequency mix, a third tone is created, called interference. It is heard, and almost felt as a low frequency vibration of the two main tones. As the main tones move away from each other the interference gets faster and more violent. As the tones get closer to each other the interference slows down, and for a moment the tones reach an equilibrium state, silencing the third tone completely.

Text by Kristoffer Myskja

 

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Kristoffer Myskja Interference machine, 2009.

Glass, water, oil, cotton pads, brass gears and frame, steel shafts, motor.

© Images courtesy of the artist.

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